To Kill a Mocking Bird by Harper Lee – Episode 35

To Kill a Mocking Bird – Episode 35

To Kill a MockingbirdTo Kill a Mockingbird is the 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by the American author Harper Lee. It was published in 1960.

Told by the six-year-old Jean Louise Finch, known as Scout, the story takes place during three years (1933–35) of the Great Depression in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, the seat of Maycomb County. Nicknamed Scout, she lives with her older brother Jeremy, nicknamed Jem, and their widowed father Atticus, a middle-aged lawyer.  It is the story of Scout, her brother, Jem, and their small town.  The story revolves largely around Addicus’ defense of Tom Robins, an African-American, for the alleged rape of Mayella Ewell.  But the story is also full of small-town stories and wonderful characters.

Recommended Age:

Due to some of the racially charged topics and language of this book we suggest 14-15 to start this book.

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Looking for more books like To Kill a Mockingbird? check out or other Shows:

Penderwicks

Secret Garden

Of Mice and Men

 

Transcript: (This was done by AI so it may not be 100% correct, just trying it out)

Alora

Hello, and welcome back to reading radio.

Alora

I’m Alora

Jason

and I’m Jason.

Alora

This month’s book is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. This was one of the books chosen by our Facebook page. I think I have no idea I’m not allowed on it.

Jason

Yes, it was a top vote that remain for our Facebook groups polls for what books we should do. And that so it the topwas a topic. So we did. But before we jump into all that, you have a very important announcement.

Alora

I am being published again.

Jason

Yay. Tell us about it.

Alora

So I entered a writing competition through young writers, USA, it was a 100 word, short story. That was the limits. And the theme was trapped. And my story was chosen to be published.

Jason

Nice. And you didn’t tell us that you’re putting in for this? No, I didn’t. You just decided to surprise us.

Alora

Yes. And then I forgot about it. And my mom opened the letter and called me up and I completely forgot. And she used my name. And so I thought I was in trouble. And then she handed me the paper.

Jason

So I don’t even know. Okay, I was at work when this happened. You didn’t tell me this. I’m hearing this for the first time. So she opened your mail. Was it addressed to you or addressed to the parents?

Alora

I think it was addressed to me.

Jason

That’s a felony. We want us to take this part out. Oh, no. Anyway, so yeah. So she found out people you didn’t get a chance to tell her? Yes, she. So what inspired you to write the story?

Alora

I just saw it and I kind of had nothing else to do because it was in the midst of quarantines. So I wrote it out. I went through a few drafts. And then like kind of settled on was, um, they’re trapped in a maze.

Jason

Okay, so some sort of contest or something. Yeah, Hunger Games ish, like, Yeah. All right. And you always like that kind of weird trippy stuff, like, I’m worried for what things you’re gonna get into in the future.

There’s just, like, even in the books, all right. Well,

that’s I don’t mean in real life. I mean, that kind of Anyway, we’ll talk about limits on what you can put in your earholes later. But that’s good. That sounds good. So I’m, uh, I’m buried deep in a new job, helping to save the world, we’re helping to roll out the COVID vaccine. So it makes me feel really good about what I’m doing. But it is exhausting work. And so I barely have time to do anything outside of work, and this podcast and run you kids all over the place. So I don’t have a whole lot to share. But I am hoping to save the world. Yay. Super Daddy. Yeah. Along with what you’re saying earlier. If you are not a member of our Facebook group, head over to Facebook. I always forget this slash groups slash reading Radio Podcast, I believe is the name. If you look for reading radio, you’ll find us but join the group, just to tell us what your favorite book was a kid as a kid to make sure you’re not a robot. And then you also can get a chance to decide what we’re going to read for future books. All right, initial impressions overall, to kill Mockingbird go,

Alora

I didn’t have very many I feel like I see is over every book for the classics for the classics, I didn’t really have much of an expectation of it. Because it’s not one of those books that tend to be read in school, or at least other. I haven’t heard other people talking about it. So I was curious about it. I think I expected more of a fantasy style. And it wasn’t it was more of a realistic fiction. I’m not sure what’s right.

Jason

With john rrah. Fiction. Yeah, it’s just the story of what happened. Yeah, it’s actually been banned in a lot of schools for the use of the N word. I think karpeles addressed that. And we don’t have to get into any of that. Not any of that kind of conversation now. But I don’t know if they’re reading it in schools anymore, maybe in high school level, because I think they still can read some Mark Twain and things like that, that also that are pieces of their time. I should say. It’s probably a good way to put that. Yeah, I honestly I knew something about it. But I totally got it mixed up with a book or a movie called a time to kill that starring Matthew McConaughey. And I’ll probably get in trouble for not getting this right maybe Morgan Freeman. No, it’s not Morgan Freeman. And it might be Samuel Jackson actually. Anyway, I don’t remember it’s but it’s another trial. Deep South kind of thing. That’s what I actually thought I thought that movie was based off this book. Oh, so coming into it. I had a completely gone misconceptions. I never had to read this as a kid. But it was one of those things that I always thought would be good to read. So a scale of one to five. What did you think?

I keep it a four. Yeah,

Alora

I think was really good. There are a few parts that were a bit off putting. But I did enjoy it overall.

Jason

off putting. We can talk about that spoilers I guess spoilers on man I want to go for I’m gonna go for although I’m really tempted to go four and a half. Because I love I’m learning. I love these kind of stories. Where it’s just, there’s not big. There’s not a mystery. There’s not a MacGuffin. There’s not a big bad guy plotting to take over the world like that things like penderwicks and Little Women and this. It’s just a story of people. lives in a picture into a point in time. Now, obviously, it’s probably it’s not completely realistic, but I’m sure there are millions of towns just like that in the deep south in the 1930s. You know, I’m sure Lewis town where you know where I’m from is is much like that, from the 1930s and 40s. Like, maybe not, as, you know, culturally the same, because we had different cultures in the country a long time ago, where we weren’t all watching the same television shows and whatnot across the country. So the South probably had some nuances that the North didn’t have, and vice versa. But I love looking into those things. I’m almost a four and a half, but I’m gonna stick with the four corners. Now we don’t do that. Too much work. Yeah. What do you think of the age appropriate? levelness?

I’d say 14

Alora

or 15? Yeah. There was. Nothing explicitly said. But the trial at the end was a question of whether or not this young woman was raped. Yeah, so that would be questionable, especially because I’m gonna guess younger kids would have questions about that. Sure. And the use

not explained in the book.

Jason

And the use of some culturally colorful language will say, including the N word, but definitely want to keep that up around the 1415 depending on Yeah, depending on how your kids can deal with that kind of stuff.

Alora

I think this is one of the first books we’ve done that’s been older.

Jason

Yeah, probably, we’ve done a lot of middle grade and young adult. But classics, I think, tend to have that tendency to be older. Even at all, like the Secret Garden wasn’t that way. Cinder garden was really good. That’s another one though. I’d have a little bit of the magic in it. But it’s really more like the mind over matter. stuff than any kind of real magic. Despite what the movie would make you believe. Don’t get me started. On that, No, we don’t. It’ll just be me yelling for an hour. Kind of taping though. Yeah, I’m almost hesitant to do our next book just because I’m thinking I might start watching the movies before I read the books.

Alora

treason?

Jason

I know, I know. Look, we can have a little bit of a conversation on this. And then we’ll get into the To Kill a Mockingbird. Here’s the thing. If you read the book first, and then watch the movie, you almost never enjoy the movie. But if you watch the movie first and then read the book, you enjoy them both.

Alora

I’m going to say the book in question is the knife that never lets go just to make that clear. And the movies chaos walking the

Jason

knife love letting go. Knife of Never Letting go. I thought it was an okay, I’ll trust you. And it’s the first book of the chaos walking series which comes out or is out right now. As we record this in late February.

Alora

It is late February,

Jason

so it’s coming out. But yeah, that’s that I was very much a hardcore you know, I made you walk I made you read all the books before we watch the movies for everything. And now I’m thinking if you want to have two enjoyable experiences, you might need to watch the movie first. Tell us what you think. And the reading radio, reading radio Facebook group or on Twitter at reading radio show sh o because there’s not enough letters to actually put w on Twitter. But tell us what you think whether you should read the books, or watch the movies first.

Alora

All right, you want to give a summary of the book?

Jason

No, but I will say we’re gonna head into spoiler territory. So if you haven’t read the book, and don’t be spoiled, stop, go read the book, listen to the audio, watch the movie even come back and join us for the conversation because we are now going to talk about everything I look.

Alora

I don’t know where all this movie stars come from. But Dang, you’ve changed.

Jason

I’m growing wiser maybe wiser. I don’t know. Lazy my old age. So yeah, the summary the books, obviously about scouting her her dad Atticus, which is weird, because they call him Atticus. And it took me a little bit to figure out that that was her father. Her brother Jim, friend, Jim, Jeff. It sounds like so the reader in the audio because I did the audiobook the reader sounded with an accent like it was just the accent that made her say Jim, Jim. Chris, he’s read it with mostly a southern accent. So I actually had to look in your book and see that that’s what his name was Jay em. Yeah. Anyway. And it’s almost like it’s two books. Yes. It’s the story of their childhood and Boo Radley who’s the neighbor who stabbed his parents. Yeah, in a in a weird, crazy rage and how he never leaves the house. And so this is what you understand about living in a small town. I grew up in a small town, every town had some crazy person or the story of some crazy person somewhere. And so they were almost like urban legends of your town before your town before urban legends were like nationwide on the internet. That makes sense. So we had ski pole man, this guy walked around wearing a backpacking backpack and carried ski poles all day long. It’s probably some guy getting some hiking exercise, right? But we all thought he was crazy. And there’s a couple other people around town. It was a cold crazy selling. So it was totally inappropriate. The way you were when you’re young and dumb. So I related to that in that way. But I love the fact that the author laid out clues that he was alright. Like when he stitched up gems pants and folded them up and left them there for him. Like I thought that was a neat way to foreshadow that. He’s okay.

Alora

interesting way of introducing it.

Jason

Yeah. That’s you see, don’t that’s it. Lesson don’t introduce your characters in normal ways. find interesting ways to that fit their character to introduce them. Yeah, what do you what do you think? Was your memorable scenes?

Alora

memorable scenes?

I don’t know. I kind of liked in the beginning when they were just kind of like being kids and rolling around in the tire and like daring each other to go to the house. Yeah, the kind of stupid stuff. Yeah,

Jason

so we have an old house. I think I’ve pointed it out to you. It had been abandoned. And I think they might be torn down now. But ever since I was a kid, and it was hot. It was the haunted house using air quotes. And we dare each other to go up to it and all that kind of stuff. She living in the suburbs, you don’t have that kind of adventure around here. Of course, you’re also not that bored. Because we were bored. There was no screen standard, as I

Alora

think the author very much wrote scout older than they stated her age to be.

Jason

Is that because it gets you said it took you a while to read it. It’s actually the adult Scout, going back and telling the story of how Jim broke his arm. From the beginning, so it’s actually an adult narrator telling the story of her childhood self. Does that make that make you feel any better about it? Yes. I and I didn’t figure that out myself. I read it on some websites when I was researching for the book. So here’s a question. I grew up with a lot of these images. But I guess being more exposed to some of the ideas of racism, not like that, my anyone I knew was but there was a lot of shows on TV that exposed that as people were trying to come out of the 70s into the 80s, that sort of thing. What were your impressions of like the kids relationship with the calpurnia. And then the the two communities of the white folk and a black folk in the town and how they interacted with each other.

Alora

I think this scene where the kids go to church with calpurnia does a really good example of setting that up without explicitly stating, yeah, I think this book does a really good job of showing not telling Yes, yeah. Which is like advice that’s all over the internet for writers show not tell. And so it does a good job of laying that out about the bigger cultural differences that you may not see as much of now. So is it like how people were kind of disgusted of having the two young white kids in their church,

Jason

so don’t be confused. Church is the one place where there still massive divides. Like there’s major cultural differences with a traditional black church and a traditional white church. Now, there are some places obviously that’s that’s blended together. And you have you have kind of mixed cultures if you were but I love that that whole scene of of laying that out how Cal took them to church, and then I loved how Auntie was so confused was so upset that she they went to church with her. It’s like, What do you care? They went to church, they heard a sermon. Now, I actually been to a church where it’s like, We’re not leaving until we get enough money.

Alora

Wait, seriously?

Jason

Yeah, very seriously. It’s like an old and it’s not I mean, man ever really locked the doors? Well, maybe they did in the book in in fire code days, they don’t really lock doors, but they’ll say we’re locking the doors kind of stuff. And it was just it’s a throwback to that old Southern revivalist kind of style. And just kind of brought me back to it, watching that.

Alora

I didn’t realize it was an actual thing that See, I thought that was just one of the more fictionalized parts

Jason

Oh, no, that’s a

real thing. People would people wouldn’t we’re not leaving here, especially if it’s like for a particular purpose. Like to take care of Tom. We’re not leaving here. And so we’ve got enough to take care of Tom. So y’all another quarter from everybody. But I think you’re you’re talking about how she shows and not tells is one of the reasons this is a classic,

Alora

because it stays along as well. Because it does, even though it does age quite a bit. It does a good job of reiterating the points that she’s trying to point out that do become important for the book.

Jason

Wait, wait, it age, the book ages or the the author or the narrator scout ages, the

Alora

book ages?

Jason

Okay,

Alora

so some of the differences, I’m sure have changed, obviously, because that’s what happens. Yeah. But then the author re iterates the fact and accentuates the points that she needs to without telling you right out. So it does bring you into that time, even if you never really experienced it.

Jason

Yeah. So another great example of that is the rabid dog. She started down this tale of a rabid dog. First of all, I accidentally tried to switch from one device to another, and hurt it. Well, I just like who’s wandering around just some drunk wandering down the street to back up and find out what happened. I think I fell asleep listening to it. But anyway,

Alora

I thought it was a drunk at first as well reading it.

Jason

So this rabid dogs coming down and you’re just like, where’s this going? Is this was one of those weird scenes where it’s just a filler like it doesn’t really have a point. And then like, he started Why is he asking Atticus to take a shot? That doesn’t make any sense? Oh, and then you find out this whole history of Atticus, which doesn’t doesn’t play out a whole lot to the rest of the story, but it does give you some insight as to Atticus isn’t quite who scout please is. Leah laid him out to be as his perfect saint

Alora

and you always See your parents perfect? until they get old enough to know better?

Jason

I’ve told you all along I’m not perfect. So I don’t want to hear you. I have your bubble burst at some point. What did you think of scouts teacher?

Alora

Okay, it’s been a minute.

Jason

So she told her not to read.

Alora

Yeah, um, like, just seems like a very interesting thing to tell a kid. Like, let’s

Jason

take the advanced kids say now you stop learning.

Alora

Stop learning stop writing. Go be dumb, and her

Jason

whole like, She’s like, you don’t you’re gonna take away my time with my father where we read together. Oh, no. Like, I love Scott’s attitude about it. She’s like, that’s just not gonna happen.

Alora

And she’s 60 which makes it even better. She’s like, no, yeah, I’m gonna keep reading.

Jason

And could you imagine a day where kids showed up for the first day of school and never came back again? That’s a very rural thing. Like they didn’t need no book learning kind of stuff. I wish I could do that. Really? You know? I mean, there’s a reason we make you learn even when you don’t want to try to find ways that make it productive. You’re gonna find you learned so much from doing a podcast. My dad was teaching me the whole time. Mine Oh, this

Alora

is a learning tool. Oh, God changes thing.

Jason

Oh, yeah. I’m gonna have you reprogramming the website. No time. Because it does need some work. We understand.

Alora

under construction.

Jason

Yeah. So what else? What was interesting? Why do you think this is this is every asked that why is this a classic? We had our Okay. All right.

Alora

So it was interesting to point out like the different facts about the kids and how she like the school scenes did a good way of giving, showing scouts personality, about how she was so quick to go to a fight to protect the people she cares about. Which does a good job of again, showing that personality without like somebody else pointing out the fact that she’s a more aggressive hothead character.

Jason

Yeah. Which I mean, she great character.

Alora

Yes. Very.

Jason

I mean, I can see this like six year old girl, like, not wearing her dresses like she’s supposed to back in the 30s. And her dad has been like, she’ll do what she’s gonna do. And she’s fine. she’ll grow up, you know, whatever she wants to be. I can just picture Atticus, like, thick, thick horn rimmed glasses and

Alora

just kind of giving up at some point,

Jason

not giving up but just understanding that she she is who she is going to be. And if he tries to fight against that, it’s not going to turn well.

Alora

The parts where she did have to wear a dress for funny. Yeah.

Jason

There’s almost like a punishment,

Alora

like around her and because she hated her to begin with. So

Jason

well. You should hit her as a person just that she tried to change her and tried to make her be something she’s not. And she hated having those faked interactions that she’d have around town kind of thing. What did you think of Mrs. Henry Lafayette? Do boy do boys depending on it? That’s how they pronounced it the audio book. Do you remember what I’m talking about? Yes. Okay.

Alora

She was an interesting, like, interesting character to begin with kind of the older cranky woman of the neighborhood. I feel like again, everyone has. It has that. Yeah. And so then they do. What did they do?

Jason

They she kept insulting she felt insulted. Atticus, and so gems, like trashed her flowers.

Alora

And so then she Gemma has to go and read to her day after day.

Jason

And you remember, like what was happening that

Alora

she had been setting her alarm back further and further. So that stay longer?

Jason

I didn’t mean that part. So she’d been hooked on opium? Oh, yeah. Like this was this was a tell not show. But there’s really not a way to show it. He showed she showed the whole process of what she went through and withdrawals. But to give that reveal at the end, where she was like, nothing’s gonna have a hold on me. And despite the pain and none and everything she had to go through, she was going to go meet her maker with nothing having a whole dinner. So that detoxing that she had to go through was I mean, it’s it’s vicious. And I’m sure there was nothing to help like we have drugs now that kind of help wean you off of it and that kind of thing. But she probably would have taken any of those. Because she just wanted to get herself clean, cold turkey and go gone. I saw the power. I don’t know why that struck me so much. Because it was just kind of a it wasn’t a throwaway. But was it was a sidetrack. Yes, but it was a really powerful sidetrack.

Alora

I think there’s a lot of good, like miniature lessons like that. Throughout the course of the book.

Jason

Yeah, I agree. There’s a lot, a lot of little things there like you’re not judging people. And we are sure I mean, I think we do we both agree that the the hole in the tree that they are fit with was Boo Radley. And so the building that relationship with Him not judging people by the exteriors, and not taking things for granted, standing up for what you believe in, like so many good messages. We’re about halfway. So let’s get into the second.

Alora

We are about halfway

Jason

second book or second half of the book with the trial of Tom Robinson.

Alora

I thought this part was interesting. In what way the whole thing?

Jason

Can you be more specific? In what way was it interesting.

Alora

It was interesting to see how the kids reacted and how everyone was so keen on keeping a woman and children out of the courtroom. So that was also an interesting part and then kind of talking about how this closer to the end, how the people the jury was so eat would have been so easily influenced by choosing the choice even if they didn’t believe in it because they thought because they wanted to keep their businesses going.

Jason

Yeah, I mean, a small town. That’s tough. That’s why they should have asked for change of venue. And I think they mentioned it, but I can’t remember when it came, what came up? Do you think Atticus would have taken the case if he wouldn’t have been assigned to it?

Alora

I think if Tony asked him he probably would have really, yes. Because he

Jason

did definitely fall under that, like I’m doing because I have to not be a good defense for him publicly. But he seemed like the kind of guy who would have done it would have done it anyway. Least that’s that’s why scouts portraying you know, whether she’s a reliable narrator or not. It’s kind of up in the air. Like, again, you said you always look at your especially in retrospect, you look at your parents, you know, with rose colored glasses, so maybe she’s looking at him differently. But I love that he put somebody on the truck on the jury that he thought might, how do you say it vote against him? Yeah, like he probably knew everybody would. But he thought at least one person would have gained respect enough for him with that. Jail jailhouse stand that they took. There’s a lot of truth in that. Like people not getting a chance to get to trial, because

Alora

people knock them off

Jason

more treacherous, treacherous sheriffs just step out of the way. And let the mob come in and do justice. There’s that there’s a horrible history of that in, in southern America, particularly, but I’m sure other parts of America as well. So that was a good insight, kind of that era of what might have happened. But I love that he’s just sitting there. And then what’s his name? Had the gun like the gun had him covered with a rifle from above?

Oh, yeah, we

did have we did have something to take care of that. It’s a good story. I think it is. If this was written today, I feel like Tom would have gotten gotten away or gotten off. Yes, they would have never had a story where that definitely reality the fact I mean, he wasn’t gonna get get get off scot free, despite the fact that it was obvious what happened. So again, but again, that could be unreliable narrator I don’t know. But but for the way the story is written, he should have been found innocent,

obviously.

But it was just showing that that’s the injustice of the system.

Alora

That’s the culture, which again, good job showing that. Yeah, I said that very many times. But it’s a good like this was written 30. In the 60s, I think it was in the 30s was it written in the 30s?

Jason

Oh, written written, it was published in 1960. But it’s set in the 30s. I’m with you. Now. God

Alora

did a good job of almost acting as a history book, almost. Because then you learn things. That’s the best way to learn things without attending to so you know that you’re able to glean knowledge about what the past would have been like, without living through it. Or just getting a list of facts.

Jason

All books that are somewhat realistic, can act as glimpses into history. It’s almost like you’re learning my reading. Good night, everybody.

Alora

Make me stop reading. No.

Jason

Yeah, there’s no power on the verse that can make you stop

you right. Alright, so

after the trial, we’ve got the situation

Alora

the Halloween

Jason

Yeah. Which let’s just let’s get right to the end with with Mr. Ewell attacking the kids. You want to check Atticus, that’s fine. But to attack his children

Yes,

I can seem kind of poetic justice in it because Atticus somewhat attacked his daughter on the stand.

Yes.

We’re talking about an eight year old and a 12 year old or something like that. Yeah, you’re grown man with a knife. I got I got no say in the dark. Yeah, I got no sympathy for what happened. But here’s so here’s the question where the sheriff and Atticus wrong for not at least taking it to trial and calling it self defense.

Alora

Technically, yes. But at the same time, I believe that it was I think I would have done the same thing, especially after just going through the trial.

Jason

Yeah. And Bill Bradley having a history Yes.

Alora

Me Out wrong, because they knew what happened. But at the same time, they knew the other side of the story.

Jason

Yeah. And so did you catch the cut the callback there? To turn him in would be like shooting a mockingbird. And it’s a sin To Kill a Mockingbird?

Alora

Yes.

Jason

That was a that was a wonderful tie in. Like there’s a lot of Chekhov’s guns here that I missed completely. Look it up. You don’t know what it is.

Alora

But there are small things which should make it even better,

Jason

right? So it’s not like the obvious big gun that goes off. Yeah, it wasn’t anything that I was like, Oh, this is gonna come back or here I can easily see what’s gonna happen. And then I love endings that don’t give you

Alora

endings. Yeah,

Jason

I mean, perfect. It was like perfect closure. He just walks into Jim’s room. And that was it. And then it’s not like she was now that I told you that story. Although there is a there’s a second book. There is she published it more recently. But it’s not like, we need to go back in here this whole story if that was the background, that was the story. And it’s perfect. I don’t I don’t need

Alora

it very subtle ending, which I enjoy, because it leaves questions but at the same time not all the important things are wrapped up

Jason

but I was very satisfied.

Alora

Yes, I was really get into it.

Jason

I wasn’t at the end going Oh no. Why didn’t you tell me this? Why don’t you do that? I was just like, Huh, perfect.

Alora

I think books now tend to like not leave enough loose ends.

Jason

What was the last book you read that that wasn’t setting up for a sequel because it was written in a trilogy to start with? Who writes the great American novel anymore? That’s like that one book that is self contained and beautiful. Maybe we’re just not reading the right books. If you know a good one again. Tell us on Twitter. Tell us in the Facebook group. Let’s read it. Especially if it’s me. Maybe it’s not as good ya stuff because they might be writing

Alora

my son men was a good stand on but again, that’s an older one. Yeah, because it did leave the loose ends. And it was a good it was a good satisfying tragic ending.

Jason

Yeah, it was.

Alora

It was I think books lack now because everyone no one wants to stop ending.

Jason

Well, it seems like people are okay with killing a character or two. But not a fully tragic ending. Yes. Where Where? I mean, Of Mice and Men is a better example. This was not this was a this had some tragedy in it but I don’t think it was a tragic ending for the main characters. I mean, obviously Tom’s and where he went crazy and tried to run away I still wonder if if that’s just what they said. They just decided to kill him and said he was trying to run away also happened very frequently back in the day, because he was gonna question that police officers. Exactly. We all say he ran away we shot we shot him in the back because he was running away. Like, who knows? Maybe he really did, cuz he just couldn’t bear the thought of leaving his wife and kids and whatnot. But I don’t know.

Alora

It does leave a lot of questions like that.

Jason

It does but they’re not question again, not questions that I’m wanting answers for. I’m not I’m not like an email Harper. Lee. Like were telling me what happened. All right. So that wraps it up for To Kill a Mockingbird. Great book if you are old enough to handle it. Yes. That’s where we landed. And our next book is

Alora

our next book is going to be the Knife of Never Letting go by Patrick Ness, which is the first book in the chaos walking trilogy.

Jason

Another trilogy. See, nobody can just write a straight book. I know we should read the many lives of no delete Legion, the many lives of what’s his name?

Alora

Oh, the one we’ll see. I look for it. Yeah,

Jason

yes, a good one. And give you that one as a freebie. It’s called legions by Brandon Sanderson.

Alora

It’s three small short stories kind of things. We can do a Zoe, she built that. Yeah,

Jason

really good. I’ve read it twice. Now. It’s really good. Hey, we’re gonna read the Knife of Never Letting go. I know nothing about it. I don’t know when it said I don’t know what’s going on. But we know the movie is coming out. You’ve read a chapter. You’ve read a chapter. So that’ll be our book for April. And then we’ll have one more in May and then we’ll take our summer break.

Alora

Yes. All right. All right, everybody.

Jason

Happy reading. Thanks

Alora

for listening.

Jason

reading radio is a podcast released under a Creative Commons 3.0 sharealike license music that you’re now hearing is by Kevin MacLeod of incomtech also released under Creative Commons sharealike attribution license tools you can use this show for any non commercial purposes only give us credit. All modes and anything else you’d want to find out about reading radio can be found at reading dash radio.com. If you head over there, you can subscribe to this podcast as well as join our Facebook group where you can contribute to telling us what books we should read. Because reading radio is all about bringing families and friends together through a mutual love of young adult literature and we’d love for you to join us. Happy reading

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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